New Publication: contribution to ‘Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion 2’

Frame Contemporary Art Finland’s public programme Rehearsing Hospitalities (2019-2023) connects artists, curators and other practitioners in the field of contemporary art and beyond in order to build up and mediate new practices, understandings and engagements with diverse hospitalities. In September 2020 RH held a series of events under the same title and published a new volume Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion 2. The book is edited by Yvonne Billimore and Jussi Koitela, and is available in OPEN ACCESS via Archive Books.

Inside you may find a chapter written by me ‘Viral Queering, Amplified Vulnerabilities’ (pp. 155-172).

You can check it out here.

And watch the online series of events on the Frame YouTube Channel.

And here comes a little snippet about the project taken from RH website:

Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion 2 is the second in a series of readers published by Frame Contemporary Art Finland and Archive Books, which accompany Frame’s five-year public programme Rehearsing Hospitalities.

The Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion series makes visible the processes and influences that shape the content and relations within the wider Rehearsing Hospitalities programme. The first edition in the series centered how to become more hospitable to diverse ways of knowing. The second edition leads on from this by introducing questions of access and considering access from multiple approaches, perceptions and relations.

“Now more than ever we need to be consciously reconsidering diverse forms of hospitalities and ways of being together”, say the editors Yvonne Billimore and Jussi Koitela. “With this publication we wanted to look beyond normative and institutionalised understandings of access. How can arts organisations and institutions treat access not as general or universal policy, but instead understand access needs as coming from plural and decentralised ways of knowing and experiencing the world?”

The 2020 publication came together during times marked by a myriad of global crises (COVID-19, racialized violence, ecological emergency, being among the most prominent). It is in these disconnected times that the publication and its contributors have turned to hospitality. Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion 2 is a site hosting and gathering, for coming together to re-visit, re-turn and re-configure worlds of hospitaties.

With contributions coming from a range of practitioners all with differing backgrounds, writing styles and approaches, the publication welcomes engagement across disciplines. It aims to spark critical thinking, discussion and action on access and hospitality in the field of arts and culture, and beyond.

New Publication: Special issue of the journal Australian Feminist Studies focused on Queer Death Studies

I am delighted to say that the special issue of the journal Australian Feminist Studies focused on the topic of “Queer Death Studies” and co-edited by myself, Tara Mehrabi and Nina Lykke, has finally been published.

The issue contains contributions by QDS scholars: Patricia MacCormack, Marietta Radomska, Tara Mehrabi, Stine Willum Adrian, Margrit Shildrick, Hema’ny Molina Vargas, Camila Marambio and Nina Lykke.

The collection strives to advance queerfeminist methodologies and ontological, ethical and political understandings that critically and creatively attend to the problem of death, dying and mourning in the current environmental, cultural, and socio-political contexts.

In order to learn more, do check out the introduction “Queer Death Studies: Death, Dying and Mourning From a Queerfeminist Perspective”, co-authored by myself, Tara and Nina, available in OA here.

New Publication: Methodologies of Kelp

Last month the book The Kelp Congress (in English) / Tangboka (in Norwegian), edited by Hilde Mehti, Neal Cahoon and Annette Wolfsberger, was published by NNKS Press (Nordnorsk kunstnersenter). The volume contains contributions by the participants of the Kelp Congress, an event forming part of Lofoten International Art Festival, which took place in September 2019. Among many brilliant chapters by artists and researchers you may also find an essay by Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt and myself, entitled ‘Methodologies of Kelp: On Feminist Posthumanities, Transversal Knowledge Production and Multispecies Ethics in an Age of Entanglement’.

For more info on how to order the book, see The Kelp Congress website.

More on the book itself:

Assembled from a collection of Nordic, international, and multispecies perspectives, The Kelp Congress is a gathering of writings and artworks that contribute to the recent interest in kelp and seaweed within contemporary art and thinking. The book forages for the insights that emerge through spending time together with these ecologies, revealing their inherent and entangled values.

Contributors: Aoife Casby, Devil’s Apron, Robin Everett, Tiina Arjukka Hirvonen, Janna Holmstedt, Øyvind Novak Jenssen, Signe Johannessen, Signe Lidén, Julia Lohmann, Janice McEwen, Arjen Mulder, Astrida Neimanis, Michael Pantalos, Julia Parks, Viktor Pedersen, Marietta Radomska, Francisco Trento, Danni Zuvela and Cecilia Åsberg.

And a little bit more on our contribution:

C. Åsberg, J. Holmstedt and M. Radomska, 2020. Methodologies of Kelp: On Feminist Posthumanities, Transversal Knowledge Production and Multispecies Ethics in an Age of Entanglement. In: The Kelp Congress, edited by H. Mehti, N. Cahoon, and A. Wolfsberger, Svolvær: NNKS Press, pp. 11-23.

Abstract:

This chapter takes departure in the experience gathered through our participation in two workshops: Kelp Curing and Coast, Line, forming part of the Kelp Congress, as well as our daily research and art practices. We take kelp as material entities immersed in a multitude of relations with other creatures (for whom kelp serves as both nourishment and shelter) and inorganic elements of the milieu it resides in, on the one hand, and as a figuration: a material-semiotic “map of contestable worlds” that encompasses entangled threads of “knowledge, practice and power” (Haraway 1997, 11) in its local and global sense, on the other. While drawing on our field notes from the congress and feminist posthumanities and environmental humanities literatures (e.g. Alaimo 2016; Åsberg & Braidotti 2018; Sandilands & Erickson 2010; Iovino & Opperman 2014) – with a special focus on the so-called blue humanities/oceanic humanities (e.g. DeLoughrey 2019) – that unpack human/nonhuman relations in the context of the current environmental crisis and the accompanying “slow violence” (Nixon 2011), we mobilise a reflection on and make a proposal for “thinking with kelp” as a multi-faceted methodology of transversal and transdisciplinary knowledge production and practices: situated (Haraway 1988), enfleshed, transcorporeal (Alaimo 2010), collaborative, and committed to an ethics of multispecies response-ability (Haraway 2008).

You may read it HERE.

New publication: Deterritorilising Death

It is my great pleasure to say that my latest article Deterritorialising Death: Queerfeminist Biophilosophy and Ecologies of the Non/Living in Contemporary Art, forming part of the special issue of Australian Feminist Studies focused on “Queer Death Studies: Death, Dying and Mourning From a Queerfeminist Perspective”, co-edited by myself, Tara Mehrabi and Nina Lykke, has just been published online. The text is available in OPEN ACCESS.

Abstract:

In the contemporary context of environmental crises and the degradation of resources, certain habitats become unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and species extinction. Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency and relationality as crucial characteristics of life shared by all organisms, Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a thick dividing line between humans and nonhumans, particularly evident in the context of death. On the one hand, death appears as a process common to all forms of life; on the other, as an event that distinguishes human from other organisms. Against this background, this article explores how contemporary art—in particular, the series of works The Absence of Alice (2008–2011) by Australian new-media and bioartist Svenja Kratz—challenges the normative and human-exceptionalist concept of death. By employing queerfeminist biophilosophy as a strategy that focuses on relations, processes and transformations instead of ‘essences’, the article examines the ways Kratz’s works deterritorialise the conventional concept of death. In this way, it hopes to attend to the intimacies between materialities of a human and nonhuman kind that form part of the processes of death and dying, and what follows, to reframe ethico-ontology of death as material and processual ecologies of the non/living.

KEYWORDS: queerfeminist biophilosophydeaththe non/livingQueer Death StudiesartSvenja Kratz

“Seeding Stories: A Guide To The Interior Of A Salt Water Crocodile Project” has been launched!

“Seeding Stories: A Guide To The Interior Of A Salt Water Crocodile” artwork by The Migrant Ecologies Project finally has its own beautiful website: https://seeding-stories.org/ – check it out!

More about the project (via Seeding Stories website):

“On 10 June 2019, a single grain of wheat, part of wheat-straw stuffing of a 133-year-dead, 4.7 metres long, saltwater crocodile, shot in 1887 at the mouth of the no-longer-existing Serangoon River, Singapore and kept for over a century in the Raffles Museum, migrated to the Arctic circle and was ceremonially buried in Platåberget, adjacent to the Svalbard Global Seed Bank, on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen.

This gesture was part of an artwork by the Singapore-situated Migrant Ecologies Project. The work was selected by an international jury of artists and scientists from 100 entries from all over the world for an exhibition curated and led by Dr. Fern Wickson from the Centre for Biosafety at University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway. Dr. Wickson believes that nature and human cultures are intertwined and wanted to generate a parallel initiative to remember 21st century cultural relationships with plants and seeds, next door to the world famous doomsday vault.”

AFS’s special issue on ‘Feminist Technoecologies’ is out now!

The special issue of Australian Feminist Studies focused on the topic of ‘Feminist Technoecologies’ (vol. 32, no 94) and edited by fantastic Dagmar Lorenz-Meyer, Pat Treusch and Xin Liu has just been published!

Here’s a little snippet from the introduction by the editors:

‘This special issue of Australian Feminist Studies is a collective effort to think with and through the notion of ‘feminist technoecologies’. One of the shared starting points of the contributions is that the term is not simply the conjoining, but a simultaneous reworking, of ‘technologies’ and ‘ecologies’, from various feminist perspectives. The articles provide critical responses to the contemporary challenges of environmental degradation, refugee crises and digital technologisation by asking how the boundary is drawn between the technological and the ecological, and how these distinctions are informed by implicit and explicit investments in the exceptional status of the human condition. They share the view that technology is not simply a neutral tool for management and advancement, any more than ecology is merely the environment, whose harmonious organisation becomes disturbed by human enterprises and technological interventions.’

(Lorenz-Meyer, Treusch & Xin Liu 2018: 351)

In the issue you can also find my my text Non/living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Technoecologies of Bioart’ – available in OPEN ACCESS here.

 

 

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