InterGender PhD course “Researching Differently: Transdisciplinary challenges and postconventional methodologies in feminist inguiry”

InterGender PhD course “Researching Differently: Transdisciplinary challenges and postconventional methodologies in feminist inquiry” ONLINE.

The Posthumanities Hub

Here comes an announcement from InterGender – International Consortium for Interdisciplinary Feminist Research Training:

InterGender – International Consortium for Interdisciplinary Feminist Research
Training

For this course PhD students, but also advanced Master’s students are eligible to apply.

Title of the Course: Researching Differently: Transdisciplinary challenges and postconventional methodologies in feminist inquiry

Time: 7-8-9 December 2022
Location: Zoom
Deadline for applications: 30 October 2022

Applications should be sent to:
InterGender Consortium Coordinator Edyta Just (edyta.just[at]liu.se)

Maximum number of participants: 30

Organised by:
Local InterGender Course Organizer: Linköping University
InterGender, International Consortium for Interdisciplinary Feminist Research Training

Course coordinator:
InterGender Consortium Coordinator: Edyta Just (edyta.just[at]liu.se)

Teachers:
Madina Tlostanova, Professor, Gender Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
Katja Aglert, Professor, Gender Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
Marietta Radomska, Assistant Professor, Gender Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.

Course description:
In the present condition of planetary environmental disruption, rising global inequalities, technologies intervening in ‘life…

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SPLINTERED REALITIES: RIXC Art Science Festival 2022

CALL for Conference Proposals is OPEN!

Deadline for submissions – August 15, 2022

APPLY NOW! Please send your submissions (short abstract and bio) via openconf system online: https://renewablefutures2022.rixc.lv/openconf.php 

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SPLINTERED REALITIES

The 5th RENEWABLE FUTURES Conference (Hybrid / Virtual) in the framework of RIXC Art Science Festival 2022

October 6 – 8, 2022

Riga, Latvia / virtually from Liepaja, Karlsruhe, Oslo http://rixc.org

“An ecology of the virtual is .. just as pressing as ecologies of the visible world” – Felix Guattari

RIXC in Riga is preparing the next edition of its annual Art and Science festival, which under the title SPLINTERED REALITIES will take place in Riga and virtually, including the exhibition opening program (August 25, 2022) followed by artist talks, guided tours, workshops and performances (August 25 – October 15, 2022), and the final international conference event (October 6–8,  2022). The SPLINTERED REALITIES Conference of RIXC Festival, is the 5th edition of the Renewable Futures conference series. The Conference will take place from October 6 – 8, 2022, as a hybrid event; rhe on-site part will take place at the RIXC gallery in Riga, hosting keynote speakers, panel curators, co-chairs and moderators, while most of the participants (selected through an open call) will be joining online, including in hybridity format sessions co-hosted by RIXC partners – NAIA in Karlsruhe, MPLab in Liepaja and FeLT in Oslo.

SPLINTERED REALITIES 

Conference October 6 – 8, 2022, Riga (Hybrid and Virtual)

The SPLINTERED REALITIES Conference will be structured into a three-day program, with each “Splinter Session” focusing on a different area or field, identifying the key “splinters” and discussing how to make tentative steps towards reconstituting our realities, everyday lives, and communication with each other, now and into the future. 

We want to meet in Riga and online, to talk, eat, play – and probably also cry – together, and imagine what it would take to build a world in which wars like the current Russian onslaught on Ukraine would become impossible. We choose such a perspective because our realism is neither that of military strategists, nor that of cultural pessimists. Instead, ours is a desperate realism – perhaps in the spirit of Guattari’s ecososphy, Latour’s terrestrial coexistence, or Haraway’s question of how to live on a damaged Earth.. Media ubiquity, pandemic concerns, and social divisions have landed us in a world of splintered realities – to live with? to heal? to learn from nature?

The Conference will also look at creative practices that deal with “splintered realities”, showcasing what art can do and discussing what kind of (extended reality) technologies can help us to become more open (and sensitive) towards each other and our environments. 

We don’t expect to provide answers. Instead, the conference aims to be a forum for revising the “splinters” of our contemporary condition – affected moreover by ongoing military conflict.

[Splinter Session 01: Deep Europe] on Day 1 (6 Oct) “in the rear-view mirror of history” – will focus on the current situation in Europe, with a focus on the Baltics and Central and Eastern Europe, discussing and evaluating the “splinters” from the perspective of the past. Day 1 will feature the “Syndicate Meeting”, and artist presentations hosted by MPLab in Liepaja, which will be European Capital of Culture in 2027.

The “Syndicate” was an extended, informal network of artists and cultural practitioners based in Europe and beyond, that was active in the second half of the 1990s. Besides its online mailing list, the participants organised meetings for amicable encounters and professional exchange. We want to revive this format and again hold a Syndicate Meeting under the label of “Deep Europe”, a notion that does not refer to a particular territory, but to the awareness that identities and histories are always layered and entangled, a messy formation that cannot be ‘cleared up’, but that should rather be cherished and cultivated – in Europe, and elsewhere.

Session 01 curators: Andreas Broeckmann and Rasa Smite.

Topics: Deep Europe, Entangled Histories, Cultivated Futures, New Ecosophies, Extended Realities

[Splinter Session 02: Naturecultures] on Day 2 (7 Oct) “how to live in the damaged world” – will examine eco-feminist perspectives and other new ecosophies, learning from nature and our relations with it, in a search of new cultural theories and art practices that contribute towards goals of socio-ecological justice.

Day 2 will be hosted by the new Karlsruhe based art center – NAIA (Naturally Artificial Intelligence Art association), featuring presentations by Karlsruhe UNESCO Media Art city artists.

Session 02 curators and co-chairs: Anett Holzheid, Eva-Maria Lopez, Daria Mille / NAIA Topics: NatureCultures, Eco-feminism, More-than-Human, Socio-Ecological Justice, Naturally/Artificial IntIntelligences… 

[Splinter Session 03: Living Technologies] on Day 3 (8 Oct) ”in intersections between human beings, living environments and machines” – will focus on how life and the sense of aliveness are experienced and expressed today, in the face of environmental degradation, global pandemics, the war in Ukraine – splinters that raise the fear of domination, and that evoke a sense of the uncanny. Might they also point to a world of possibilities of becoming, creation of new forms and behaviors? Can we co-create more balanced forms of existence?

Day 3 will be hosted by the FeLT project team from Oslo, Norway, who are also co-founders of the Renewable Futures conference series. It will also feature the Green Revisited Book presentation by editors Kristin Bergaust, Jens Hauser and Rasa Smite.

Session 03 curators: Kristin Bergaust, Jens Hauser and FeLT (Oslo) project team. Topics: Techno-Ecological Sensoriums, AI and Biological Systems, Technologies of Sensible, Terrestrial Co-existence, Beyond Green…

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APPLY NOW!  

CALL for Conference Proposals is OPEN!

Deadline for submissions – August 15, 2022

If you are interested in an on-site or virtual participation and contribution, please, submit your proposals (a short abstract and bio) for the RIXC Festival / Renewable Futures conference via the openconf system: 

https://renewablefutures2022.rixc.lv/openconf.php

related to the following topics:

01-1 Deep Europe, Entangled Histories and Cultivated Futures, 01-2 New Ecosophies and Extended Realities

02-1 NatureCultures, Eco-feminism and Socio-Ecological Justice, 02-2 More-than-Human and Naturally/Artificial IntIntelligences 03-1 Techno-Ecological Sensoriums, AI and Biological Systems, 

03-2 Technologies of Care, Terrestrial Co-existence, and Beyond Green

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Registration Fees / Tickets

Early Bird fee: 18 EUR Full fee: 36 EUR Students: 50% reduction.

Conference Registration and Early Bird tickets will be available from July 15, 2022 via eventbrite system.

On-site Exhibitions in kim? and RIXC gallery has a free entrance. 

Guided Tours for school groups can be booked for no charge via e-mail rixc@rixc.org

Producers and Contact:

The Festival is Produced by The RIXC Centre for New Media Culture. 

Festival curators: Rasa Smite (rasa@rixc.org) and Raitis Smits (raitis@rixc.org)

Festival producer: Agnese Baranova (agnese@rixc.org)

PR and information coordinator: Liva Silina (rixc@rixc.org)

Contact e-mail: rixc@rixc.org  

Phones: +371 29635167 (Agnese Baranova), +371 26546776 (Rasa Smite)

Address: RIXC the Centre for New Media Culture, Lencu iela 2, Riga, LV-1010, Latvia

Partners:

The SPLINTERED REALITIES Festival and Conference partners are: NAIA/Karlsruhe, MPLab/Liepaja, FeLT/Oslo.

Support:

The festival is supported by The State Culture Capital Foundation of Latvia,  Riga City Council, the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Latvia, Goethe Institute, and others.

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http://rixc.org

PH & EBL hybrid seminar on “Design Ecologies: Towards Artistic and Postconventional (Research) Practices”, 14th June!

Join us on 14th June!

The Posthumanities Hub

Welcome to The Posthumanities Hub & The Eco- and Bioart Lab Hybrid Seminar on “Design Ecologies: Towards Artistic and Postconventional (Research) Practices” with speakers Carrie Foulkes (University of Glasgow) and Dr Lynn Wilson (University of Glasgow), which takes place on 14th June at 13:15-15:00 CEST in the room Faros (Tema building, Campus Valla, Linköping University), and on Zoom (for registration details, see below)

Generous emptiness: sculptural and architectural encounters

Abstract:

Photo: Carrie Foulkes, Monument on a Hill

This talk will ponder different kinds of ‘emptiness’ and their potentialities. As a way into thinking about some relevant themes, I’ll introduce the Sun Hive, exploring the hive’s material and conceptual aspects and how it symbolises a certain kind of relationship between humans and honeybees. Unlike many other forms of bee box that already have frames installed inside them, the Sun Hive provides a colony with a primarily ’empty’ space in which…

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PH & EBL Seminar/Webinar with Prof. Thom van Dooren, 30th May, 13:15-15:00 CEST

Exciting event in Linköping and on Zoom on 30th May!

The Posthumanities Hub

It is our great pleasure to welcome you all to the upcoming Posthumanities Hub and The Eco- and Bioart Lab Seminar/Webinar with Prof. Thom van Dooren (University of Sydney/University of Oslo) on “The craft of poisoning: learning not to eat cane toads

The seminar/webinar will have a hybrid format.

When: 30th May, 13:15 – 15:00 CEST

Where: Room FAROS, Tema building, Linköping University (Campus Valla) & on Zoom. For the registration link, see below.

The craft of poisoning: learning not to eat cane toads

Abstract:

Since their introduction in 1935, cane toads have been making their way across the top half of the Australian continent. As they’ve moved, they have left a wave of death in their wake, animals poisoned by the unfamiliar toxins that toad’s carry. All efforts to eradicate toads, or even slow their advance, have failed. In recent years, however, a new set…

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PH & EBL Webinar on “Saturation Epistemologies”, 14th February, 17:15-19:00 CET

Join us on 14th Feb at 17:15-19:00 CET!

The Posthumanities Hub

We are pleased to invite you all to the upcoming Posthumanities Hub and The Eco- and Bioart Lab Webinar on “SATURATION EPISTEMOLOGIES” with Melody Jue (UC Santa Barbara) and Rafico Ruiz (Canadian Centre for Architecture).

The event takes place on 14th February 2022 at 17:15-19:00 CET on Zoom (for registration, see below).

Webinar on ‘Saturation Epistemologies’ with Melody Jue and Rafico Ruiz

In this presentation, Melody Jue and Rafico Ruiz discuss saturation epistemologies in their recent collectionSaturation: An Elemental Politics(Duke Press, 2021). Poised as an alternative framework to object-focused inquiries and metaphors of entanglement, saturation points us to those situations where substances are not so easily isolated or tangled but may be materially or figuratively co-present. While saturation starts as a form of watery thinking, they show how it also draws our attention to thresholds, phase changes, and precipitates of matter.

MelodyJueis Associate Professor of English at…

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2 year POSTDOC job with the Hub!!

Postdoc position at The Posthumanities Hub!

The Posthumanities Hub

Astrida Neimanis, Marietta Radomska, Olga Cielemecka, Janna Holmstedt, Lina Rahm, Adam Wickberg – —now, ARE YOU the NEXT POSTDOC with The Posthumanities Hub? Welcome to apply for this research position with Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Gender Studies and The Posthumanities Hub: Gender, Nature, Culture!

Postdoc in Gender Studies with a focus on feminist environmental- and posthumanities

Linköping University, Sweden. RefTEMA-2021-00231

Skilled and committed employees are a crucial factor in the success of Linköping University. And we need more of them. Our core expertise comes from teachers and researchers, but a successful university requires experienced and motivated employees in many fields. Everyone is important. We need to recruit many new employees thanks to, among all, an expansion in our research activity. We need you here. We look forward to receiving your application!

The Department of Thematic Studies (TEMA) was the first in Sweden to offer an academic setting…

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Queer Ecologies, Art and Science: Panel talk by Mary Maggic and Marietta Radomska

During the past several months I have given a number of talks in many diverse places and on different occasions. I haven’t been very good at documenting them, though.

Yet, this week I’ve had a great pleasure to take part in an event organised by The Archive of Pink Noises/Arkivet för Rosa Brus: a panel talk/conversation between artist Mary Maggic and myself, focused on the topic of Queer Ecologies, Art and Science.

The panel talk was livestreamed on Facebook on 8th December at 19h00-21h00 CET. In case you missed it, you can still watch the recording HERE.

And here comes the description of the event published by Rosa Brus:

As part of a series of panel talks, the queer sound archive The Archive of Pink Noises has invited scholar Marietta Radomska and artist Mary Maggic to discuss the emerging scholarly and artistic field of “queer ecologies” based in their own scientific and artistic practices.How can we imagine and critically understand the relations between life/death, living/non-living, human/non-human in a world of evironmental toxicities and hormone biopolitics from different queer ecological and/or ecophilosophical perspectives? What role can art play as a political tool in this endeavour? Conversely, what role can science and critical theory play in one’s art practices? What arenas of public discourse are the most important and urgent ones in which to intervene politically? And what methods and methodologies can one develop in one’s own science and art practices?The duration of the talk is approximately 60 minutes, with time for questions after the main talk.

MARY MAGGIC
Mary Maggic (b. Los Angeles, ’91) is a non-binary artist working at the intersection of cultural discourse, body and gender politics and ecological alienations. Using biohacking and public amateurism as a critical practice of care, Maggic investigates the micro-performativity of hormones and works collaboratively to demystify their molecular colonization.
https://maggic.ooo

MARIETTA RADOMSKA
Marietta Radomska, PhD, Assistant Professor in Environmental Humanities, Linköping University (Unit Gender Studies), Sweden; director of The Eco- and Bioart Lab; co-director of The Posthumanities Hub; and co-founder of Queer Death Studies Network. She works at the intersection of posthumanities, philosophy, queer death studies, and visual culture. www.mariettaradomska.com

THE ARCHIVE OF PINK NOISES
Arkivet för Rosa Brus (The Archive of Pink Noises) is a queer sound archive that aims to collect, archive and publish queer culture production in sonic form and we view (queer) sound as a bearer of history. We do this in collaboration with other archives, artists, activists and scholars. By collecting, archiving, reading and arranging public events in the shape of festivals, workshops and site-specific sound pieces around Sweden, we explore together with all the participants what pink noise and a queer sound archive can be. The work of AfRB is made in collaboration with the cultural association Tupilak (www.tupilak.org) and with grants from Kulturbryggan (Konstnärsnämnden/The Swedish Arts Grants Committee).
For more information or for submitting material to the archive please visit us at www.rosabrus.nu

‘END OF THE SEA? ART AND SCIENCE FOR MULTISPECIES FUTURES’ WORKSHOP, 13th December 2021.

Join us on 13th December for another exciting event I have a pleasure to co-curate together with my colleague, Prof. Cecilia Åsberg!

The Posthumanities Hub

It is our great pleasure to announce our upcoming event, hosted by The Eco- and Bioart Lab and The Posthumanities Hub, and generously supported by The Seed Box and Åke Wiberg Foundation:

End of the Sea? Art and Science for Multispecies Futures Workshop takes place on 13th December 2021 at 13:15 – 16:30 – on Zoom!

For registration details – see below.

As the planet’s largest ecosystem, oceans and seas stabilise climate, produce oxygen, store CO2and host unfathomable multitudes of creatures at a deep-time scale. In recent decades, scientific assessments have indicated that marine environments are seriously degraded to the detriment of most near-future human and nonhuman communities.This matters to us, too.Climate change, environmental destruction and diminishing biological diversity form the key pillars of the present more-than-human crisis of planetary proportions.This calls for our attention and for responses from the more-than-human humanities.

Still, a lot remains unknown at the levels…

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Seaside Arts and Low-Trophic Imaginaries: A State of the Art Network Mid-term event

Seaside Arts and Low-trophic Imaginaries! More info coming soon…

The Posthumanities Hub

On 30th September and 1st October we will have a pleasure to host the event forming part of the State of the Art Network (SOTAN) activities, which will take place on the island of Ornö in Stockholm Archipelago. It will have a hybrid format (with eight participants on location and others taking part via Zoom) and will be open to all SOTAN members as well as registered non-SOTAN participants. More info on registration will come via our website (i.e. here) soon.

SEASIDEARTSAND LOW-TROPHIC IMAGINARIES, Location: Ornö, Stockholm Archipelago, and online.

All through the extended history of Earth, the coastline has been a zone of unrest, where waves and tides have forged life and land on this planet. Oceanic algae, once terraforming the Earth into a breathable planet, still produce most of our oxygen. Today, beaches and oceans are haunted by plastic waste, eutrophication and diminishing biological diversity. Kelp forests and…

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Call for abstracts: Queer Death Studies Reader. Edited by Nina Lykke, Marietta Radomska and Tara Mehrabi

The field of Queer Death Studies

The planned reader will gather a wide range of contributions to the field of Queer Death Studies (QDS). This is an emerging, transdisciplinary field of study which takes research on death, dying, and mourning in new directions, inspired by feminist, posthumanist, decolonial, anti-racist, queer, trans, body- and affect-theoretical scholarship, art and activism (Radomska, Mehrabi and Lykke 2020). What distinguishes QDS from conventional Death Studies such as death sociology or anthropology of death is an overall critical focus on the framing of death and extinction in the contemporary world through Anthropocene necropolitics (Mbembe 2003, Lykke 2019) and necropowers of post/colonialism, racial and extractivist capitalism. Death is approached as an ethico-political issue that is embedded in global power structures. QDS pays attention to systematic, necropolitical productions of death, in dialogue with ethico-political critiques emerging from political movements for social, environmental and planetary justice and change. QDS is also based on critiques of the dichotomous divides, characterising Western modernity, and is marked out through a critical focus on normativities and exclusionary notions of the human, casting the death of those who differ from the normative human subject in terms of gender, racialisation, migration status, class, geopolitical situatedness, able-bodiedness, and species as less grievable or disposable and not counting at all (Butler 2004). In short, QDS aligns itself with critiques of the intra-acting multiplicity of hierarchising divides between appropriate and in/appropriate/d others (Minh-ha 1989), articulated by social, environmental and planetary justice movements.

The Call

With this call, we invite abstracts from researchers, students, artists and activists who see their research and activities as aligned with critiques of the necropowers operating in the contemporary world, and who want to contribute to queering, decolonising and posthumanising death and the onto-epistemololgies and politics conventionally framing death.

QUEERING, DECOLONISING AND POSTHUMANISING

The verbform, queering, which we use here, encompasses a wide range of meanings. It refers to (1) open-ended deconstructing of normativities and processes of normalisation in various forms, as well as (2) undoing of heteropatriarchy, heteronormativity, binary gender and sexualities governed by reproductive biopowers or, in other words, the normative heterosexual matrix. Queering death is thus on the one hand understood as a critical strange-making, and defamiliarising, which may imply affirmative openings of other horizons than Christian and Cartesian dualist approaches to death, for example a focus on the vibrant entanglement of growing and decomposing (Radomska 2017; Lykke 2022). On the other hand, queering means critically focusing on the ways in which misogyny, trans- and queerphobia lead to social as well as physical death, and how violence and hate crimes towards non-normative individuals seek to render their lives and deaths non-grievable (Puar 2007; Chen 2012; Snorton 2017). Together with this broad spectrum of meanings, we also want to emphasise that queering should be understood in its intersections with decolonising and posthumanising efforts

Decolonising death involves critically dismantling the violent necropowers of colonisation, racial and extractivist capitalism, which for centuries have made death become ”life’s quiet companion” (Lehman 1997) for racialised and indigenous people worldwide, as well as confronting the over-arching racisms which continue to produce (physical, social and cultural) death along racialised lines. Moreover, decolonising death signals a turn towards pluritopic hermeneutics (Tlostanova and Mignolo 2009), i.e. hermeneutics which do not universalise Western modern frameworks, and which reevaluate indigenous philosophies, cosm-ontologies and sensibilities. In terms of life/death thresholds, this implies critically-affirmatively shifting the meanings of death, for example, substituting conceptualisations and imaginaries of death as a final endpoint within a chrononormative linear temporality, and instead opting for understandings, situated in geo- and corpo-political frameworks outside of Western modernity (e.g. Smith 1999; Anzaldua 2015).

Posthumanising death refers to the systematic problematisation of the planetary-scale mechanisms of annihilation of the more-than-human world in their ontological, epistemological and ethico-political dimensions. It involves critical analyses of the human/nonhuman divide and power differentials that have allowed for the reduction of the nonhuman to mere resource and instrument for human endeavours. Furthermore, the posthumanising move entails unpacking philosophical and cultural meanings of extinction and the ways in which it fundamentally disrupts life processes in relation to time, death and generations (e.g. Rose 2012); it draws attention to environmental violence, environmental grief, as well as nonhuman death manufactured en masse through anthropocentric habits of consumption and mechanisms of extractivism.

Consequently, posthumanising death takes seriously the issues of responsibility, accountability and care for/in dying more-than-human worlds, while remaining grounded in radical critiques of human exceptionalism, and affirmative embrace of alternatives (eg. Braidotti 2013; Haraway 2016; MacCormack 2020).

Formats and deadlines:

We call for abstracts of approximately 300 words, to be accompanied by a bio-note of approximately 200 words, as well as by a title of the proposed chapter and an indication of how the chapter relates to the below main themes to be covered in the reader.

Please, send your abstract etc to ninly[at]fastmail, cc: <marietta.radomska[at]liu.se> and <Tara.Mehrabi[at]kau.se>

Abstract DEADLINE: 1st NOVEMBER, 2021

We will respond to your abstract by MID-JANUARY 2022, and foresee submissions of FIRST DRAFT CHAPTERS by August 1, 2022.

We plan a reader with around 50 contributions, including a few reprints of classics. Scholarly as well as creative and artistic contributions are welcome! We hope together with contributors to build a reader which will be significant and agenda-setting for the field

THEMATIC CLUSTERS:

*Queering Death: Rethinking life/death ecologies

*Histories of necropowers and Anthropocene necropolitics

*Decolonising death

*Posthumanising death

*Demedicalising death

*Politics and Ethics of Mourning

*Alternative Spiritual, Aesthetic and Arts Activist Approaches to Death and After-life

The International Network for Queer Death Studies

The idea for the reader grew out of the international network for Queer Death Studies, which was founded in 2016, (see https://queerdeathstudies.net/). The network has organised several workshops and an international conference at Karlstad University, Sweden, in 2019.

We have earlier published two special journal issues of Australian Feminist Studies (2020, Vol 35 (104)), and Women, Gender and Research (2019: Issue 3-4).

REFERENCES

Anzaldua, G. E. (2015), Light in the Dark/Luz en Lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity, Reality, Spirituality, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Braidotti, R. (2013), The Posthuman, Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Butler, J. (1990), Gender Trouble. Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, London, New York: Routledge.

Butler, J. (2004), Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence, New York, NY: Verso.

Chen, M. Y. (2012), Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering and Queer Affect, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Haraway, Donna (2016), Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press.

Lehman, G. (1997), ‘Life’s Quiet Companion’, in G. Carey and R. Sorenson (eds), The Penguin Book of Death, 223–232, Ringwood: Penguin Australia.

Lykke, N. (2019), ‘Making Live and Letting Die: Cancerous Bodies between Anthropocene Necropolitics and Chthulucene Kinship’, Environmental Humanities, 11 (1): 108–36.

Lykke, N (2022), Vibrant Death. A Posthuman Phenomenology of Mourning. London: Bloomsbury Academic.

MacCormack, Patricia (2020a), The Ahuman Manifesto. Activism for the End of the Anthropocene. London: Bloomsbury Academic.

Mbembe, A. (2003), Necropolitics, Public Culture, 15 (1): 11–40.

Minh-ha, T. T. (1989), Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism, Bloomington and Indianapolis IN: Indiana University Press.

Puar, J. (2007), Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times, Durham: Duke UP-

Radomska, M., T. Mehrabi, and N. Lykke (2020), Queer Death Studies: Death, Dying and Mourning From a Queerfeminist Perspective, Australian Feminist Studies, 35(104): 81-100.

Radomska, M. (2017), Non/living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Technoecologies of Bioart, Australian Feminist Studies, 32 (94): 377-394.

Rose, D. B. (2012), Multispecies knots of ethical time, Environmental Philosophy, 9(1): 127–140.

Shildrick, M (2020) Queering the Social Imaginaries of the Dead, Australian Feminist Studies, 35(104): 170-185.

Smith, L.T. 1999. Decolonizing Methodologies. Research and Indigenous Peoples. London and New York: Zed books.

Snorton, C.R (2017), Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Tlostanova, M. and W. Mignolo (2009), On Pluritopic Hermeneutics, Trans-Modern Thinking, and Decolonial Philosophy, Encounters, 1 (1): 11–27.

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